Red hair III

Red Hair III

Here is the third painting in the Red Hair Trilogy. I guess this is the most detailed except for the hair. I have left this underpainted deliberately to see if I can live with it like this. I did plan a less life like portrait but I couldn’t help myself as the day went on. My compromise is the hair and , not like me at all, I have left the white background with no paint at all.

It will be tomorrow when I decide if that is it. I think it is. It is my favourite of the three. Kate’s expression here is somewhere between melancholia and “Can I go soon?”

~ by David Reid on April 1, 2015.

9 Responses to “Red hair III”

  1. I’m captivated by her – the complement of her eyes against the red hair is awesome. Definitely can feel her annoyance and wanting to go, that’s so good David that you captured this expression. You are a master of portraits.

  2. fantastic.

  3. Fabulous. Just the right balance of ‘finish’ and ‘unfinish’

  4. The answer is, Yes, I *do* enjoy this one at least as much as the others! I can’t help but think that part of her expression is one of contemplation—thinking up precisely how she’ll exact her payment from you for so many sittings. 😉 I think that leaving the raw gesso behind her emphasizes the sense that she is emerging from nothingness, in a way, and that just adds layers of possibility to what she might be thinking.

    As for the degrees of finish, I’m finding that many of my favorites of yours are ones where you create a deliberate focus with a portion of the work being much more finished than the rest, and each step out from the focal point showing earlier and earlier states of the pieces. I’ve always been attracted to art that allows us to see parts of the process and progress this way, even before I understood that it was what I was seeing.

    But I think some of the attraction remains because it’s such a potent combination of being able to sense more of the process *and* being reminded that what artists give us at best is not mere artifice but their part of a long conversation or story, something rich and layered and complicated that, with long practice and amazing skill and delicate insight, seems almost miraculous in its ability to transport us into the scene by seeming both compelling and mysterious at the same time.

    I am constantly in awe of and moved by your artworks, David. I wish I could afford to take lessons from you! But I certainly feel I learn a lot each time I see your work, too.

    Cheers,
    Kathryn

    • Kathryn, I am so lucky to have you comment on here! I am very grateful for the insights which are so eloquently described. Thank you!
      Sorry it took so long to reply, you rendered me speechless for a week or so. ha ha.
      I have sent this one away with six other paintings to Glasgow Contemporary Art Fair this weekend. I am looking forward to seeing how they get on. It’s something I dont often get the chance to do being a portrait painter, but I think it will be good to get some feedback from the general public. A sale would be good too of course. We’ll see.

      Thanks again, David

  5. I agree with Mary and Rosie- fantastic work!

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